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Cornell University Library 
PN 3206.A79 

Beauty's awakenini 



3 1924 027 189 996 o..,»,i 







XI 



Cornell University 
Library 



The original of this book is in 
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BEAVTYJT 
AWAKENING 

AMAiC^E 

OFWlhfTER 

AND OF JPRING 



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AD. VIII 



BEAUTY'S AWAKENING, 

A MASQUE OF WINTER AND OF 

SPRING. 







7 7 ^~^ t 



THE 5TVDIO 

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YTlP.HHVH'iU 

VII AH . I.'' 




THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY: TO 
THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR 
JOHN VOCE MOORE, KNIGHT, 
LORD MAYOR OF LONDON. 

»E who have gone so far as to devise and con- 
trive, invent, arrange, and finally bring forth, 
(with what completeness we may), this our 
: Masque, have even dared further in our bold- 
nesSj&have added to our so-great risk another 
' as weighty and considerable; which is, that we 
have ventured to ask (& by your kindness have 
obtained) leave and permission to set our enter- 
tainment before yourLordship,in the presence 
of the Sheriffs, Aldermen, & leading Citizens 
of London, and in your own and ancient Guildhall. 
WHICH favour, asked by us, and granted by you, goes far in our sight, 
we would say, to demonstrate two things. 

First, that the City (in the persons of your Lordship, & of those who 
aid you in its governance and careful administration) is as willing to take 
to-day, as in times past, the position of a chief and foremost supporter and 
friend to those working in the Crafts and Arts we practice and pursue. 

And, secondly, the permission to thus appear before the body of 
which your Lordship is the head, encourages us,the Art Workers' Guild, 
to think that that intimate connection between the various Crafts we ex- 
ercise and the City, that was wont in other times to subsist, is perhaps to 
be revived and to obtain once more. And this hope we would urge as ex- 
cuse and cover for presenting before you, this night, our Masque, & of thus 
re-instituting a custom that prevailed in other and earlier times, though 
now fallen into unhappy desuetude. 

FOLLOWING, though with no too hard and rigid a consistency, the 
method and manner of the Masque of older and earlier days, not only in 
the general ordering of our action, but in the particular of the shapingof 
this Epistle Dedicatory, we would through the means of this latter thank 
your Lordship for the occasion granted to us for putting forth our Enter- 
tainment here and now. Our hope, beforehand, is — with Cicero — (de 
Orat. I., 3) Agere cum dignitate etvenustate, and at the close to be able, on 
your mandate, to say with Plautus — Operant ludo etdelkiee dedimus. 
WHAT meaning there is in the Allegory that underlies our Action is not 
far to seek, nor is our Dream an empty, baseless show. We have striven to 
set forth as well by Poetry and Music as by the various Arts that appeal 
a2 3 



to and address the eye, that love (on the one hand) of London, our City 
and (on the other) of the Art we follow, which makes us hope that a day 
and time will come when, as our City is the greatest in the world, so she 
shall be the most beautiful, and that, pre-eminent now in commerce, 
■So then shall she also be the leader of cities in the symbolizing of her 
Greatness by the Beauty of her outward Show. ' 

MOVED and animated, then, by suchahope, we in humbleness and yet 
in confidence lay before your Lordship oiir Masque, 

THE PRESENTERS AND CONTRIVERS. 




TO THE CANDID AND GOOD NA- 
TURED AUDIENCE. 

MASQUE is not a Play and was not a Play, 
nor could be mistaken for one when the two 
[existed side by side, and we who are submit- 
' ting the present Pageant & Allegory to your 
' indulgence, wish, at setting out, to insure that 
you shall not expect things which are not in- 
cluded in our aim. 

THERE are certain things more necessary to 
Masque than they are to Drama,such as Poetic 
and Ethic Aim, Beauty of Design and Orna- 
ment.Ben Jonson was writing masques that cost thousands of pounds (even 
in those days) to produce, while Shakespeare was acting against a ' back 
cloth;' or not even so much, as we now use the word. 
THE Drama and the Masque did not interchange or overlap; though, 
later, as we know, a certain Mr. Puff blended a little of the Masque with 
his tragedy — " a new fancy you know — and very useful in my case." May 
we express a hope inpassingthat if our Masque do not set the Thames on 
fire we may at least succeed in "keeping him between his Banks." The 
digression may be pardoned : the allusion was too obvious and too tempt- 
ing for our scribe to resist. 

AND though now in our days the Stage hasborrowed the Gorgeous Gar- 
ment of Masque, we feel that there is something still possible to do when 
Artists who are Designers, but who do not confuse their aim therein with 
too much attempt at realism and illusion, try to produce an allegory of the 
Beautiful which is their particular sphere and concern. 
DO not, therefore, we would ask you, expect stage illusion or stage per- 
fectness from us — we confess ourselves Amateurs & Pupils in those things ; 
we rather present to you in awkwardly acted shape those Dreams & Fan- 
cies which usually form the subject of our Brush and Chisel or other the 
noble Tools of our Craft. 

DESIGN, then, instead of Illusion: something good (we hope) in Form 
and Colour and Fancy, & something perhaps worth thought in Allegory 
and Moral Meaning. 

AND here let us make a confession : That although the whole scheme is 
set forth as the wish of us all, yet the several Episodes have been placed 
in the hands of individuals ;& these (artist-wise) have been left very much 
to themselves in the carrying of their ideas into being. 
IN looking at our Patchwork therefore, do not let it jar if scenes differ in 
character, perhaps with somewhat sudden change; our aim being to pro- 

aS 5 



duce something wherein, as in a Mediaeval Building, the surprising freak 
of fancy and generally the Unexpected "spoils the proportion and unity 
of the whole," as he would say who is used to work all things out by square 
and rule, — "makes the human interest of the whole "we would rather say 
who hold that Man should be Man. So in judging of our Patchwork (as 
we have styled it),judge itasyouwouldjudgeNature'sMosaicsofthings 
Different; for the Sea is not the Land, nor Rocks Trees, yet they go to- 
gether. 

AND even if any thing offends you let this thought allay your anger; that 
it was deemed better to let some strong individualities pass than to ham- 
per an Artist, once his task was assigned to him. There is (we will freely 
allow it) many a sly hit, or for the matter of that many a bold one, at this 
or that feature of our many coloured age, which some of us,ifwe set our- 
selves to be too sensitive, would feel the Sting of upon our own Backs. 
And yet the fraternity of our confraternity we are assured will suffer no 
diminishing by the thrust at these things made by one of the family 
circle. 

AFTER all, that will live which will live; and to put things upon their 
trial is to put them also upon their mettle; which is good and welcome 
to all things that have mettle and are worth their trial. 
SO we feel it, & so we would ask the indulgent Audience to feel it, when 
the whip-lash goes round, thinking no more seriously of it than of the 
Jester's Bladder of Peas and Sword of Lath that wakes the Duller ones in 
some assembly where dulness is forbid. 
AND so we leave ourselves to your Mercy. 



"TIME." AN ETCHING 
BY WILLIAM STRANG 



BEAUTY'S AWAKENING, 
A MASQUE OF WINTER AND OF 
SPRING, WRITTEN, DESIGNED & 
CONTRIVED BY THE MEMBERS 
OF THE ART WORKERS' GUILD, 
AND FINALLY PRESENTED BY 
THEM IN THE GUILDHALL OF 
THE CITY OF LONDON, BEFORE 
THERT.HON.THELORDMAYOR, 
SHERIFFS, ALDERMEN, & COM- 
MON COUNCIL, ON THE TWEN- 
TY-NINTH DAYOF JUNE,EIGHT- 
EEN HUNDRED AND NINETY- 
NINE. 



A Citizen (leaping upon the stage) : Hold your peace, good'man boy I 
Speaker of the ■Prologue: What do you mean, sir? 

Cit,: That you have no good meaning: Down with your title boy, 

down with your title ! 

■&. ofProl.: Are you a member of this noble city? 

C/l^.;Iam. 

S. ofProl.: And a freeman? 

Cit.: Yea and a grocer. 

S. ofProl.: So, grocer, then, by your sweet favour we intend no abuse to 

the city. ^ 

Cit.: No, sir! Yes, sir: ifyou were not resolved to play the Jacks, whatneed 

you study for new subjects purposely to abuse your betters? Why could 

jiot you be contented,as well as others,with" The Legend of Whittington" 

or the "Life and Death of Sir Thomas Gresham, with the building of the 

Royal Exchange," or the " Story of Queen Eleanor, with the rearing of 

London Bridge upon woolsacks?" 

S. ofProl.: You seem to be an understanding man: what would you have 

us do, sir? 

Cit.: Why present something notably in honour of the commons of the 

city. 

— Beaumont AND Fletcher: 

The Knight of the Burning Pestle. ' 



THE CHARACTERS OF THE 
MASQUE. 

TIME: the Speaker of the Prologue. 

THE PROLOCUTOR. 

THE FOUR WINDS. 

THE FOREST LEAVES,DECEMBER,MARCH,& BUTTERFLY. 

THE MUSICIANS IN THE DANCE OF THE WINDS. 

TRUEHEART: the Seeker. 

HOPE. 

FORTITUDE. 

FAYREMONDE: the Spirit of all things beautiful. 

MALEBODEA: a Witch. 

ASCHEMON: a Dragon. 

THE SEVEN LAMPS OF ARCHITECTURE: in attendance on 
Fayremonde : 
THE LAMP OF SACRIFICE. 
THE LAMP OF TRUTH. 
THE LAMP OF BEAUTY. 
THE LAMP OF POWER. 
THE LAMP OF LIFE. 
THE LAMP OF MEMORY. 
THE LAMP OF OBEDIENCE. 

CLIO: the Muse of History. 

THE FAIR CITIES OF THE WORLD: who appear in vision and 
in pageant before Fayremonde. 

THE FAIR CITY OF THEBES. 
THE FAIR CITY OF ATHENS 
THE FAIR CITY OF ROME. 
THE FAIR CITY OF BYZANTIUM. 
THE FAIR CITY OF FLORENCE. 
THE FAIR CITY OF VENICE. 
THE FAIR CITY OF NUREMBURG. 
THE FAIR CITY OF PARIS. 
THE FAIR CITY OF OXFORD. 

9 



IN THE PAGEANT OF THE FAIR CITIES & IN ATTEND- 
ANCE UPON THEM. 

RAMESSES II: in attendanse upon the fair City of Thebes. 

PHEIDIAS : in attendance upon the fair City of Athens, together 
with two Youths from the Lysis of Plato. 

AUGUSTUS^ in attendance upon the fair City of Rome, together 
with three Youths from Mantegna's Triumph of Cssar. 

CONSTANTINE: in attendance upon the fair City of Byzantium, 
together with St. Helena the Cross-bearer. 

DANTE and CIMABUE: in attendance upon the fair City of 
Florence, together with two Pages as train-bearers. 

TITIAN: in attendance upon thefairCity of Venice, togetherwith 
a Doge, two Brides of the Marriage of the Adriatic, and Hal- 
berdiers. 

ALBERT DURER: in attendance upon the fair City of Nurem- 
burg, together with two Train-bearers and a group of Crafts- 
men from the workshops of Adam Kraft, Hans Sachs, P&ter 
Fischer, and Viansen. 

ST. LOUIS & JOAN OF ARC: in attendance upon the fair City 
of Paris, together with a Herald, and three female figures sym- 
bolising the Arts and Graces of Life. 

KJNG ALFRED and WILLIAM OF WYKEHAM: in attend- 
ance upon the fair City of Oxford, together with two Acolytes, 
and a group of Scholars. 

LONDON: a City once fair and who at the close of the Masque shall 
grow fair again. 

THE DEMONS ATTENDANT UPON LONDON: ofwhom seven 
are deadly Demons but one attains redemption. 

PHILISTINUS: that solid rock of British character whence flow 
the athletics of sweetness. 

BOGUS: who is both ancient and modern. 

10 



THE DEMONS {continued) 

SCAMPINUS: A most commercial, most plausible, most respect- 
able Demon, whom nobody trusts but everyone believes in. 

CUPIDITAS: whom we all have in our hearts though we fain 
would disallow it. 

IGNORAMUS: who is first cousin to Philistinus, & though more 
evil yet in better taste. 

BUMBLEBEADALUS: London's own familiar. 

SLUMDUM : who is worth his weight in gold when he barters for 
conscience. 

JERRYBUILTUS or JERRY: whom we have cherished so long, 
and understood so well. 

THE VOICE OF THE UNCONSCIONABLE. 

THE GENII ATTENDANT UPON LONDON AFTER HER 
REDEMPTION: 

LABOUR. 

INVENTION. 

FREEDOM. 

COMMERCE. 

THE FIVE SENSES: for her enjoyment and wise understanding. 

THE SPIRIT OF THE AGE: the Speaker of the Epilogue. 



II 





THE DESIGNERS OF GROUPS, 
SCENES, DANCES,& OTHER PRO- 
PERTIES IN THE MASQUE. 

IHE Masque has been carried out under the general direction of 
1 the following Committee of the Art Workers' Guild. The special 
J scenes, dances, & properties being contrived, arranged, designed, 

or fashioned as stated here below. 

Mr. WALTER CRANE, Chairman. Mr.C.R.ASHBEE, Mr. BEL- 
CHER, Mr. C.J. HAROLD COOPER, Mr. LOUIS DAVIS, Mr. 
SELWYN IMAGE, Mr. H. LONGDEN, Mr. MERVYN MAC- 
ARTNEY, Mr. H.J. L.J. MASSE, Mr. JOSEPH PENNELL, Mr. 
HOPE-PINKER, Mr. HALSEY RICARDO, Mr. C.HARRISON 
TOWNSEND, Mr. CHR.WH ALL, Mr. H.WILSON. 

IHE group of the Seven Lamps; Mr. H.Wilson & Mr, Christopher 
IWhall. ThePrologue,Time:Mr.C.H.Townsend. TheDanceof 
I theForestLeaves:Mr.LouisDavis. The Pageant of the FairCities: 

Mr.C.R. Ashbee, assisted by Mr. Walter Crane, Mr. Christopher Whall, 

Mr. E. R. Hughes, Mr.Henry HoUiday. The Demons: Mr.Christopher 

Whall, assisted by Mr. C. R. Ashbee. The Dance of the Senses: Mr. 

Walter Crane. The Hope and Fortitude Episode: Mr. Walter Crane. 

The Epilogue: The Spirit of the Age: Mr. Holroyd, assisted by Mr. 

Walter Crane. The Design for the Prolocutor: Mr. Selwyn Image. The 

Design and Planning of the Stages: Mr. H. Wilson. 

|THER assistance has been given by members of the Art Work- 
' ers' Guild as follows : The Design for Clio : Mr. Henry Holiday. 
' The Design of theThrone for London : Mr. W. R. Lethaby. The 
Design for the Tree: Mr. J.D. Batten. The Designs for Labour & Inven- 
tion: Mr. G.Moira. The Design for the Dragon: Mr. Walter Crane. The 
Forest Background: Mr. H.Wilson assisted by Mr.T. M. Rooke. The 
Director of Musical Arrangements: Mr. J. Belcher. The Assistant Stage 
Manager: Mr. Harold Cooper. The Chairman of the Publication Com- 
mittee : Mr. Joseph Pennell. The Sword forTrueheart : Mr. Nelson Daw- 
son. The Sphere and Sceptre for London, and the Clasps for the Robe of 
Commerce: Mr. Alex. Fisher. TheEtchingforTime,&otherdrawings: 
Mr. Strang. The Dress for Bogus: Mr. A. S.Haynes. The Cutting of the 
Wood Blocks for the book: Mr. W. H. Hooper. The Designs for the In- 
itial Letters: Mr. C. R. Ashbee. The Lithographs: Mr.T. R.Way. The 

12 




Crown and Clasps for London, & the Ship for Commerce : Mr. W. Crane 
and Mr. C. R. Ashbee. The Capitals for the Proscenium: Mr. Stirling 
Lee and Mr. Murphy. The Statue in the middleof the Proscenium: Mr. 
Hope-Pinker. The Couch of Fayremonde: Mr. Wilson. The Lamps: 
Mr. R. Rathbone. The Leaves in the Forest Scene: Mr. T. R. Spence. 
The Shield forTrueheart: Mr. A.J. Shirley. The Designs for the Seal for 
the Art Workers' Guild: Mr. C.J. Harold Cooper. The Printer of the 
Book: Mr. C.R. Ashbee. 

PROFESSIONALS.— Stage Manager: Mr.Hugh Moss. Dancing 
I Master: SignorEspinosa. Composer of the Music: Mr. Malcolm 
I Lawson. The Dance of the Winds: Madame Cavalazzi Mapleson, 
assisted by Signor Coppi; the music by Mr. Arnold Dolmetsch. Assist- 
ant Secretary: Mr. W. H. Ansell. 




13 



THE MASQUE. 

SCENE I. THE SLEEP OF FAYREMONDE. 
SCENE II. THE QUEST OF TRUEHEART. 
SCENE III. THE RALLY OF THE DEMONS. 
SCENE IV. THE VISION. 
SCENE V. THE AWAKENING. 
SCENE VI. THE TRIUMPH. 



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THE ACTION OF THE MASQUE. 

SETTING FORTH IN ORDER ITS VARIOUS SCENES AND 
PERSONAGES.TOGETHER WITH SUCH WORDS AS SHALL 
BE EITHER SPOKEN OR SUNG. 

HE Stage being set and arranged after the mannerof the 
ancient Masque-stage has, according to such use and 
precedent, an inner and an outer scene, space ox pegma. 
(Nihil venustius quam ilia pegmata. Cic. Att. 4, 8.^ Of 
these the backmost or inner, shews, as occasion shall re- 
' quire, a Forest-glade. But, before the opening of the 

action proper, a curtain being drawn in front of this conceals it, and, for 

the purpose of the Prologue, the whole of the Stage is in full darkness. 

Instruments of music play an Introduction, and then, after slight pause, 

voices without are heard singing the following 

RONDEAU. 

JNOTHER Page ! Fair in our sight 
] The leaf lies waiting, virgin-white, 
For Time the scribe to use the sheet. 
And make his half-told tale complete. 
Screened from us, secret, hidden quite, 
He holds his fateful pen to write 

Another Page. 
Tales blurred with tears will he indite? 
Or let the gloom be streaked with light? 
Or make a poem, tender-sweet. 
Where Life and Hope and Love shall meet? 
'TisTime that knows. He pens aright 

Another Page! 




K 



Towards the end of this song the Stage gradually lightens towards the 
centre, revealing in half-light Time as Prologue with his emblems of 
Book, and Scythe, and Glass, who shall speak 

A PROLOGUE. 

! AM the Regent of the Days; my power 
Compels in thraldom ^on,Year,and Hour 

, Into one mighty flux the Ages run. 
Past, Present, Future — these and I are one. 
The hours, those creatures of the sun and moon, 
The timid dawn-time, and the tide of noon, 

bi 17 





Slow creeping eve, and sombre stretch of night, 
The changing months and seasons in their flight. 
The years, — like wavelets of a boundless sea 
That form, and break, and straightway cease to be, — 
And all the Ages, since the world began. 
To me are moments, nay, an instant's span. 

\S old as now, I watched the Planets' birth 
, And shaping of the cosmic fragment — Earth. 
I saw the young worlds in their morning prime 

While life crept slowly from primordial slime. 

As young as now, I still shall hold my sway 

When worlds have slowly crumbled to decay; 

And when the torches of the night expire 

I still shall watch the sinking of their fire ! 

^UT here, to-night, for one forgetful hour 
' I dofFmy kingship, and put off my power. 
• For a brief space I lay aside my crown, 
And, abdicating, cast my sceptre down. 
So, by my laws unshackled, you may stand 
Within the confines of the Time-less Land, — 
The Land of Faery, where all things seem, 
Where Man and Time have melted into dream. 




1 



Soft music plays as this Prologue is in speaking and after, and at its end 
the stage slowly darkens, & the figure of Time is obscured by the growing 
darkness. There is played music, by way of introduction to the Masque 
proper, and the Spirit of Old Masque, appearing as Prolocutor {Orato- 
rem voluit esse me, non Prologum . . . Ter. Heaut. Prol. II), advances to the 
front of the stage, and sets forth inverse a forecast of the action and intent 
of the First Scene as follows: 

I AIR Dames and Sirs, in past days may ye know 
How guilds of craft presented masque and show, 

, Seemly in ancient hall, belike as here. 

E'en so do we, a Guild of Arts, prepare 
A mystery, wherein we would disclose 
How Beauty's spirit — soul of life's sweet rose- 
In deathly sleep of pale enchantment drear 
Doth lie, both she and all her vestals clear. 
i8 




While Malebodea broods, a shadow o'er her house, 
A palace fair hid in a forest close 
Of briars and thorns; and from the woodlands-drift 
A whirling dance of leaves the wild Winds lift. 
While in procession move the Seasons four, 
With Month by Month across time's silent floor. 
If such fair visions may your pleasure meet. 
Lend us your willing eyes and patience sweet. 
To read what purport deep this masque may hold 
Commingling past and present, new and old. 



E 



b 2 ig 





THE FIRST SCENE. 

THE SLEEP. 

HE innerportionof the Stage shews a tapestried cham- 
ber of a Castle orPalace,with an arcade through which 
is seen the before-mentioned Dark Forest, Fayremonde, 
the Spirit of All Things Beautiful, is discovered in apro- 
found sleep, upon a couch covered with a richpall,while 
a lamp flickers hard by. And round her are grouped her 
Attendant-maids — the Seven Lamps — each with a lamp which has died 
out. Their names are Sacrifice.Truth, Power, Beauty, Life, Memory, and 
Obedience, & they lie in slumber, partly covered with dead leaves which 
have drifted in from the Forest. Over against the sleepingform of Fayre- 
monde sits Malebodea the Witch, the Weaver of the Spell. Then after 
music, in which can be heard the piping of the Winds and the murmur 
of the storm, is sung 

THE SONG OF THE WIND AND THE LEAVES. 

|LOSED around with forest gloom, 

A jewel in a casket hid. 

Sleeps she as on storied tomb, 
The golden leaves for coverlid. 
Sleep on, sleep on, while these we strew 
In fear and hope, till Spring renew. 

'ARK ! In listening forest glade, 

' The sea-voiced winds have left their lair 
To weave the shifting shine and shade, 
O r lightly lift the Dryad's hair. 
Sleep on, sleep still, nor let th^m bear 
Pale thought of trouble to thine ear. 

iUT we zephyrs with the leaves 

" Reckless still of loss or gain 

Play, while Time his dance enweaves 

With joy and sorrow, love and pain. 
Sleep on, and lightly let them pass 
Like cloud-shadows o'er the grass. 

[INGED dreams we waft her nigh 

Of passed time and time to come: 

Let painted visions fill her sky 
Through the windows of sleep's dome. 
Sleep on, nor lightly dream in vain. 
Perchance thy dream shall live again. 

20 








[EAVE the dance \yith measured paces, 
Link our hands to weave the spell 

' The magic sphere of sleep embraces, 
Who may break it? Who shall tell? 
Sleep on, sleep on, until the morn 
The radiant hunter winds his horn. 

Then occurs a dance arranged after the following manner: Young girls 
representing the Forest Leaves, & sixteen in number, enter in sets of four, 
and their colours are crimson, brown, orange, and green.The four Winds 
following them take each his position at a several corner of the stage. 
Each bears his eniblem embroidered on his breast, their habits of vari- 
oxi^colonr^.iForthosewhichMythologizethemchuse some kinde of colour well- 

suting with the fable Mont., lib. IL, cap. X.) Each wears his insignia, 

such as the North Wind a golden ship in full sail, the West Wind a cor- 
nucopiafrom which Spring flowers fall,the East Wind thorns& ascourge, 
and the South Wind a dove & dew-drops powdering his robe. The leaves 
being impelled and guided by the four Winds from their stations. 
The music to this dance is performed upon ancient instruments, the play- 
ers whereof shall stand upon the stage quaintly attired. 
In a pause amid the dancing enters December bearing a star-wand and 
lantern, and having on either side of her, children representing ice and 
snow. Then come forth two musicians arrayed as angel and shepherd, & 
playing carol music while December moves to a stately measure. Decem- 
ber having gone out then enters March, armed, and having on either side 
of him, children representinglambs, whereupon the Four Winds advance 
and March fights with them. He is overcome, and lies as if dead upon the 
ground. The two lamb-children then come forward; one takes his sword, 
and the other, bearing a little red-cross banner, gives it to him^ and he 
straightway comes to life and goes out triumphant. Then takes place a 
Morris dance, and the Leaves clap their hands, and, as the rows of dancers 
divide, a little girl runs betwixt them swathed in a brown cloak, which 
being unwound is butterfly-like within. 

In this manner is. enacted the title of the Masque, Winter and Spring and 
Beauty's Awakening. 



b3 £1 




THE SECOND SCENE. 

THE QUEST. 

A curtain is painted with trees to represent the forest, and the action takes 
place on the outer stage.The four Seasons bring in and place in the centre 
of the stage atree in blossom.The Prolocutor, from his place, declares the 
forthcoming action in lines here following: 

THE PROLOCUTOR. 

|HILE 'neath the witches' spell doth Fayremonde liCj 
" Trueheart, the Seeker, on his quest doth hie; 
Who in the Forest dread, now far astray. 

Hath lost in tangled maze his tortuous way. 

Weary, he sleeps, while round his slumber weaves 

The whirling dance of Winds and Forest leaves. 

But in his sleep he hath a vision strange 

Of Hope and Fortitude, who bring a change 

Like spring, his drooping spirit to requite. 

He, lifted by the joy of Beauty's sight — 

Seen in his dream — takes courage good 

To meet the Dragon fell, in that dark wood 

Drawn from his hidden lair — a monstrous birth — 

With demons seven making devilish mirth; 

Until the Knight's steel smites the snakey scale. 

And turns their mockery to dole and wail. 



After music the Knight,Trueheart, clad in full armour, enters, bewildered 
in his quest through the forest, and with his sword broken in hewing a 
path through the opposing thickets. Wearied and in despair, he presently 
lies down under the Blossoming Tree, and sleep overtakes him, and in his 
falling asleep is heard, sung by voices without, the following 

SLEEP SONG. 

IREATHE soft, ye Winds, and lightly waft 
1 His way-worn soul to calm repose: 
Come, poppied Sleep, with kindly craft 
Each sense in sealed oblivion close: 
Ye fragrant Boughs bend gently down. 
Soothing with perfumed charm his rest: 
And all ye Spirits of Peace, that own ■> 

These woodlands, guard your wandering guest! 

22 





jLEEP, gentle Knight, brave heart and true I 
Awhile thy imperious toil forget: 

1 Or, but in roseate dreams, pursue 
The quest whereon thy soul is set. 
O radiant Vision, as dew descend 
On the parched earth; in beauty steep 
His wondering spirit, that nears her end! 
Sleep, gentle heart and valiant, sleep. 




As he sleeps, music precedes the reappearance of the four Winds and the 
Forest Leaves, who weave a dance around the Knight. While this is in 
doing, the Demons — the creatures of Malebodea, the Witch — are dis- 
cerned lurking in the background, and fitfully appear and reappear. 
Then enter Hope and Fortitude from right & left and stand by the sleep- 
ing Knight. Hope bends over him as if whispering in his ear words of cour- 
age and counsels of endurance, and breaking a spray of the Blossoming 
Tree places it for encouragement in his helmet. And Fortitude for her 
part takes from the side of the sleeping Knight his useless weapon — the 
broken sword — and in its stead places a new one, the Sword of Courage 
and Conviction Sure. Then the two pointing to the inner scene step aside 
vfhile the curtain parts, and to the Knight, as in a vision, is disclosed the 
sleeping Fayremonde with her attendant Lamps. While this is in show- 
ing there is sung the following 

SONG OF GOOD HOPE. 

I(E not afraid! 

I Seeker, brave and hopeful be. 
Tho' great thy task, and hard for thee. 
Be not dismayed! 
Fairness lies hid beneath cold custom's ban 
That hides the brotherhood of man with man. 
The tangled brakes with Doleful Creatures swarm 
While sultry o'er them broods the imminent storm. 
And the unhallowed groves with wailing clamour loud 
Shudder with blanching leaves against the thunder-cloud. 

JUT never did the world long rest 
" Content to walk in ways unblest: 

'Or nation's thunder rule the waves 

Only to guard the Dens of Knaves. 
Hearts of goodwill e'en here abide 
Whose hopes and prayers are on thy side. 

b4 23 





And healing Nature ever fresh and new 

That brings each year the spring in seemly show. 

With sword in hand and blossom'd crest 

And heart renewed renew thy quest; 

Drive the dull things of night away ■ . yy .1 

And lead along the young-eyed day ! ]r\ I 

A great noise is then heard from the depths of the forest. Trueheart, the 
Knight, awaking, grasps his lately given sword & his shield, and placing 
on his head the helm on which is displayed the branch of the Tree of En- 
couragement, prepares to meet this his new foe. Then, with great noise 
and tumult, enters, as from the wood, a huge & horrid Dragon, Aschemon 
{yidimus immani specie tortuque Draconem .... Cic. de Div. II., 30), and 
advances to attack the Knight. A great fight ensues. The eight Demons, 
in alliance with the Dragon, endeavour to thwart and to hinder True- 
heart. But he, though greatly spent, at last slays the Dragon, whom being 
dead, the Demons, lamenting^ bear from the stage. Then triumphant 
music, and Trueheart blows his bugle in token of his victory, and there 
is sung the following 

SONG OF PRAISE. 

HE bugle sounds, the monster's slain. 

Our lamps shall kindle yet again. 

i Bring up, oh bring, the gifts of price 
To heaven, to heaven the Sacrifice! 
Let Truth reveal, and Power hold. 
Let Beauty^ as of yore, unfold 
To Life that ever throbs to be. 
The quickening joys oi Memory. 
Let each reanimated sense 
Be chastened to Obedience — 

Each lamp uplifted let us raise rcg^ 

Our pxan of triumphal praise ! N^^ 




24 




THE THIRD SCENK 

THE RALLY OF THE DEMONS. 

The inner scene being again hidden by the curtain, the Prolocutor ap- 
pears and recites the following lines: 

THE PROLOCUTOR. 

jHE evil brood, though Aschemon is slain. 
By Malebodea rallied once again, 

I Conspire anew against the powers of good. 
With mocking dance and song, in hardihood 
Rejoicing in their shame, in all despite 
Of human spirits striving for the light: 
See then the Demons foul, still London's bane. 

Intent to blight her realm with blot and stain. i iwi 

Though yet their hour is brief — the bugle's sound If^K 

Strikes palsy to their hearts on Fayremonde's ground. |Va^ 

The Demons are then discovered on the stage, they are cowed and dis- 
pondent.To them enters Malebodea, the Witch; as she appears they sev- 
erally fly hither and thither, but Malebodea beckons themtoreturn.The 
music tells first of their reluctance, then of their resolution, and when at 
last they are of one mind they unite in a grotesque and fantastic dance 
around the Witch, As the dance grows wilder their courage rallies, and 
their movements grow more expressive ofwhat they still shall dare to do. 
At the close of all there is a great shout taken up without; this is the 
climax, as it dies away there is heard a voice — minatory,accusatory,plain- 
tive, mocking, the voice of conscience, the voice of human destinies, the 
voice of the unconscionable, and thus shall the voice speak, denouncing 
each Demon as in his turn he is summoned to stand forth, & at the close 
of each denunciation the chorus takes up the refrain. 

THE VOICE: Stand forth Philistinus! 

' OE for the world that has loved to define us! 
Shall it repine us, must it resign us. 
Must every Bayswater dinner be minus 

I The soapy punctilious old sneak Philistinus? 
Old sneak did I say? Kind friends — draw it easy! 
Philistinus is buoyant, and beefy and breezy. 
By the Hudder^eld weavers, the Manchester spinners, 
By all the brave bagmen that bung for their dinners. 
The Glasgow distillers, the Macclesfield fullers. 
By — (well never mind I) with his coat of bright colours ! 
Philistinus his missions, his gunboats, his traders. 
Bears the banner of exploit for modern crusaders — 

25 






By everything holy, commercial and cunning, 
Philistinus, the British, comes first in the running. 

HUFFLE,and soft soap, and slipshod, and sham; 
Culture and cram; cant in the jam, 
Press-pufFand persiflage, humbug and flam, 
, All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam! 

THE VOICE: Stand forth Bogus. 

' OE to the World, if no longer it pays 
Its tribute to Bogus the Ancient of Days — 
What ! Dare the World venture to check at the phrase? 
I Or deny ME, its Master, that guides its displays. 

And its destiny sways. 

If not ' ab initio ' at least in these days — 

Pray what will become of its crotchets and craze. 

Its conventional ways, its starch and its stays, 

Its upholstered plays, its R.I.B.A.'s, 

Or even its Laureates' Bogus bays 

Schoolboards that birch with a Bogus rod. 

Chemical peas in a Bogus pod. 

Bogus politics, (wasn't it odd 

How lamely our liberal leaders were shod, 

When the last Bogus plank of their platform was trod!) 

Bogus Art, and a Bogus God! 

Down with you Bogus under the sod! 

Hocus, pocus, bottomless Bogus! 

Shall a Puritan Jabez no longer berogue us? — 

Pounding along on a guinea pig's back. 

His cant and his companies all gone crack; 

Bogus shall howl with the rest of the pack! 

HUFFLE, and soft soap, and slipshod, and sham; 
Culture and cram; cant in the jam, 
Press-pufFand persiflage, humbug and flam. 
All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam! 

THE VOICE: Stand forth Scampius! 

k YE and Scampinus, the Sharp and the Flat, 
'With his solemn sabbatical black cravat, 
I His immaculate togs, and his silk top hat, 
I His fortune in pills, and the affable chat, 

Of his puffin the Press, for he pays for that, 

As he pays for his complaisant aristocrat, — 
26 







His margarine pat, and the drugs in his vat. 
And his spicy bread sausages, flavoured with cat. 
East and West would you give of the best. 
And reap of the worst, Scampinus you pest ? — 
Plugson of Undershot standing confessed! 
With the soul of a ghoul and the teeth of a rat, 
Scampinus accursed, come away with the rest. 

HUFFLE, and soft soap, and slipshod, and sham; 
Culture and cram; cant in the jam. 
Press-puff and persiflage, humbug and flam 
All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam ! 

THEJ^OICE: Stand forth Cupiditas! 

V, YE, and Cupiditas rank as a weed. 
That sprouts in the dung from a sodden seed. 
Not fair as of old was the Lady Mead 
But sordid with utilitarian greed. 

Your devilish dividend-hunting avidity. 

Claws all alike with impartial placidity; 

For the Shark with his Company-cadging cupidity 

Can match Ignoramus' solid stupidity. 

You are spawned on the Vestries and Boards where you breed 

For an ever devouring Democracy's need. 

You'd sell Westminster Abbey and God, to feed! 

The poor, as of old, on Iscariot's creed ! 

Shuffle Cupiditas off with speed 

To join in the dance of the Devil's stampede. 

HUFFLE, and soft soap, and slipshod and sham; 
Culture and cram; cant in the jam, 
Press-puff and persiflage, humbug and flam, 
I All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam I 

THE VOICE: Stand forth Ignoramus! 

|OES anyone shame us, or saucily name us? 
Who by the Gods of Convention dare blame us? 
Sure as M.P. and Councillor well he became us 
Our dear, platitudinous, far-hearing, famous. 

Firm, British-matronly Ignoramus? 

Ignoramus, the pity, the pity ! 

Shall you maunder no more your infallible ditty. 

As you loaf in the slum, or lounge in the City, 

Or lead the Academy hanging Committee, 

Or inflate John Bull with your self-reliance, 

27 







Or hug your departments of Art and Science? 

Shall your pride and your prurience no more inflame us? 

Down with you, Down with you. Ignoramus! 

HUFFLE,and soft soap, and slipshod and sham; 
Culture and cram; cant in the jam, 
Press-pufF and persiflage, humbug and flam. 
All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam! 

THE VOICE: Stand forth Bumblebeadalus! 

^OOM for this picturesque waxwork of Daedalus, 
Room for the London of old Bumblebeadalus! 
The London of vestries, of jobs and of lies. 
Of puffs and of posters, of signs in the skies, 

Of crawling busses and crowded trains. 

Of river monopolies, unflushed drains. 

Would you be- wheedle us old Bumblebeadalus? 

Our London, the joyless, the reckless of brains, 

The sleepy, the smoky, the sooty remains! 

And what if a tub-thumping socialist boggles 

At your mace and your furs and your gloves and your goggles, 

Old Bumble grows bigger, his heart merely hardens 

As he crawls from the Mansion House into Spring Gardens, 

For now he's but added, the more to prevail. 

To his blustering tongue, a sting to his tail; 

With his twists, and his shifts, and his betterment schemes. 

His technical education dreams. 

His cooked accounts, and his legal quirks, 

His legacies from the Board of Works, 

The reforms he gases about but shirks. 

No Bumblebeadalus, you'll not be-wheedle us! 

Though you give Mrs. Grundy a wreath of myrtle. 

Sing premature threnodies over the Turtle 

Not all the 'i's' Mac*****l dots. 

Not all the pennies in all the slots. 

Not all J**n B***s' random shots. 

Not W***'s municipal melting pots. 

Not B*****d S***'s most cynical plots 

Shall make old Bumble change his spots! 

But a City whose name shall descend into story 

As we picture her greatness or sing of her glory. 

Who shall stand as a joy to the proudest of nations, 

Such a city comes not in your calculations, 

And the treasures and charms that might make her agen 
28 



What she once was to Eveleigh or Christopher Wren, 

Old Bumble regards but as empty frivolities, 

Old Bumble has universal qualities; 

Off, off, you old reprobate — you'll not pronounce ill 

On the change from King Log to King County Council! 

^■HUFFLE,and soft soap, and slipshod and sham; 
Culture and cram; cant in the jam, 
Press-pufFand persiflage, humbug and flam, 
All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam ! 



!^iP 





THE VOICE: Stand forth Slumdum! 

^LUMDUM come, you must come with the rest of them, 
Whitechapel horrors the goriest and best of them. 
Blistering profanity fleshing a zest of them, 
Cent-per-cent. rentals and lawyers in quest of them. 

Shelters and pawnshops and preachers — a pest of them — 

Street organ, gin palace, all gone mum! 

Stop thumping your damned philanthropical drum. 

And into the limbo come, Slumdum come ! 

HUFFLE,and soft soap, and slipshod and sham; 
Culture and cram; cant in the jam, 
Press-pufFand persiflage, humbug and flam, 
> All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam ! 

THE VOICE: Stand forth Jerry ! 

L ND shall the ubiquitous Jerry come too? 

Come with his girders and " bays for a view?" 

Jerry the fanciful, Jerry the true, 

Jerry the merry, the artful, the new, 
Jerry the semi-detached, two by two, 
Little Pedlington Mayors, and District Surveyors, 
Microbe tanks, drain-pipes, and Typhoid purveyors. 
Cadging along with the rest of the crew, 
Off into Jericho Jerry goes too ! 

HUFFLE,and soft soap, and slipshod and sham; 
' Culture and cram; cant in the jam, 
Press-puff and persiflage, humbug and flam, 
, All to Dance to the Dance of the Devil's own Dam ! 

The dance and the music have grown wilder and madder; at the close of 
all there is heard again on a sudden the clarion of Trueheart, whereupon 
all disperse and the scene closes. 

29 







THE FOURTH SCENE. 

THE VISION OF FAYREMONDE. 

The Prolocutor from his place sets forth the forthcoming action in the 

lines here following: 

THE PROLOCUTOR. 

[HILES doth the Knight the darksome forest range 
Upon the Sleep of Fayremond draws a change, 
When turns the storied sphere of dreams controlled 
By Clio, stately dame who hath enscrolled 

The world's fair lore. And she doth summon there 

The images of cities nine most fair, 

As they in primal beauty decked the earth, 

When shone the slumbering lamps, and joy had birth 

In all man's labour, as with craft and art. 

Each thing of use had life to cheer the heart. 

And pictured walls emblazoned mighty deeds 

With all the people's lore, for daily needs. 

Cinctured in mutual service, walled and towered 

Behold their semblance — each a bride rich dowered. 

Fayremonde, cast by spell and enchantment into a deep sleep, is supposed 
therein to see, as in a vision, a display, in manner of procession, of those 
Fair Cities, which in olden days belonged to her realm, and owned her 
sway and governance. The scene being the inner, and arranged after the 
manner of the First Scene, these enter, each accompanied by a worthy & 
noble citizen, ruler or artist, famous & notable in the palmy days of such 
city. To set these forth in their order they are: Thebes, attended by Ra- 
messes 11. ; Athens, by Pheidias and two youths from the Lysis of Plato; 
Rome, by Augustus & three youths from Mantegnas Triumph of Caesar; 
Byzantium, by Constantine and St. Helena the Cross-bearer; Florence, 
by Dante &Cimabue, with two Pages as train-bearers; Venice, by Titian, 
with a Doge, two Brides of the Marriage of the Adriatic & Halberdiers; 
Nuremburgjby Durer,twoTrain-bearers & a group of Craftsmen from the 
workshops of Adam Kraft, Hans Sachs, Peter Fischer,& Viansen ; Paris, by 
Saint Louis & Joan of Arc, a Herald and three female figures symbolising 
the arts & graces of life ; Oxford, by King Alfred & William of Wykeham, 
two Acolytes & a group of Scholars. As these severally enter there is re- 
cited such one of the following stanzas as appertain to each city: 

THEBES. 
^W^OUNG was the world that saw me, Thebes, arise, 
^\ Serene in wisdom, and in state serene: 

Sphinx-like I sat, and watched with fateful eyes 






Myriad on myriad slaves salute ine Queen. 

Deep to earth's core I tracked her secret ways, 

And charmed the majestic heavens to crown my praise. 

ATHENS. 

|ISDOM was mine, and Beauty: mine the Joy 
' Sprung from their fathomless depths withdrawn, serene: 
Nor while the world endures shall age destroy 

The seal and dominion of my gracious mien. 

Lo ! violet-crowned, a Queen 'neath cloudless skies. 

Full on Perfection gazed my faultless eyes. 

ROME. 

WAS the Mistress of the World; on me 
I The gods had laid the imperial soul for dower. 
I came, I saw, I conquered earth and sea. 
And from my touch sprang desert lands to flower. 
Chaos before me fled, and girt with awe 
Deep in men's hearts I set the throne of Law. 

BYZANTIUM. 

WAS the daughter of imperial Rome, 
Crowned by her Empress of the mystic East: 
I The Most Holy Wisdom chose me for her home. 

Sealed me Truth's regent, and high Beauty's priest. 

Lo ! when Fate struck with hideous flame and sword. 

Far o'er the new world's life my grace outpoured. 

FLORENCE. 

FLORENCE am I, the peerless Flower of all. 
The blood-red Lily borne on Arno's wave! 

1 1 am the Bride of Art, the imperial 

Mistress of Beauty, for whom Dante gave 
His heart's blood; and grave Buonarotti's spell 
Enchained the world within my citadel. 

VENICE. 

JORN of the Sea was I, yea, born of the Sea, 
' When the young Dawn first kissed and turned to rose 
Her orient pearl. Majestic, strenuous, free, 

Calm in my soul, I feared no mortal foes. 

Back to their East the Crescent hordes I hurled : 

And Europe breathed once more, a rescued world. 

31 







NUREMBURG. 

|TRONG as the sun, fair as the rose in June, 
For Duty and Beauty all my soul afire; 

I Life's chords discordant trained to perfect tune, 
Deft hands, stout heart, knit fast to one desire: 
Sound to the core, self-centred, buoyant, free, 
I bore my sons to Toil and Liberty. 

PARIS. 

)0 ! 'neath these northern skies enthroned, on me 

Art set her daintiest touch, and charmed my hand 

To deftest cunning and felicity, 
Since her last radiance sank o'er Grecian land; 
Gay as an April morn Love's kisses thrill 
I hold men's hearts in thraldom at my will. 

OXFORD. 

|UDE was this land, when lo! my spirit rose 
I At Alfred's summoning by Isis' shore; 
And the Eternal Wisdom bade unclose 
In Oxford's halls her grave, mysterious lore. 
Ah! yet, poor World, thy weary soul desires 
The secret spells that haunt my dreaming spires ! 






Moving to a stately march, they all, in turn, bow to Fayremonde,& pass 
away, leaving her still wrapt in her magic slumber, & as they are leaving, 
the Prolocutor, from his place, speaks the following words: 

THE PROLOCUTOR. 

|NE yet remains, in mean attire, distrest, 
' Though holding riches more than all the rest — 
E'en London, blackened with the smoke of toil 

And luxury, and tangled in the moil 

Of penury and care, mid wealth untold. 

With rich historic garment torn and old — 

Creature of shreds and patches, yet a queen, 

By Demons fell tormented and made mean. 

For her deliverance may we hope and pray 

That she, a city fair, may rise one day. 





^ 



Towards the close of these verses enters hurriedly, London, pursued by 
the eight Demons who torment her. After which they leave the stage, & 
the curtain falls over the inner scene. 

32 



THE FIFTH SCENE. 

THE AWAKENING. 

The Prolocutor from his place sets forth the forthcoming action in the 
lines here following: 

THE PROLOCUTOR. 

iO ! now the Knight's clear bugle sounds the knell 

' Of Malebodea and her baneful spell. 
As through the dark enchantment he doth break 
With light and life and love for the fair sake 
Of Fay remonde, with the magic of a kiss 
Won to the world that her did sorely miss: 
Rekindle each fair vestal's sacred flame 
Whose light the powers of darkness hence shall shame. 
And bring joy back upon the sun's warm beams 
To re-create the garden of youth's dreams. 
Wherein the Senses Five their dance renew, 
As shall appear forthwith in order due. 





The inner scene is set out as in the first scene. The sound of the Knight's 
bugle horn is heard from the depths of the forest. Malebodea starts and 
rising to her feet looks around in affright as if for help. To her then enter 
the Demons; they gather round their protectress, capering grotesquely. 
Trueheart, the Knight, enters, his sword being drawn, and with the air 
of a victor, and confronts theDemons ScMalebodea, and breaking through 
them while they cower back on either side of the stage, he enters through 
the arcade, and approaching the couch of Fayremonde, bends over her in 
wonderment&in happy satisfaction at the conclusion of his quest. There 
is then sung, by voices without, the 

SONG OF THE AWAKENING. 

JAKE, lovely maid, thy foes no more withhold me! 
Loosed is the spell that long enchained thine eyes. 
Now may the healing from thy glance gifold me. 

Wake, sweet one, wake, and make me wise ! 

lIM shews the golden earth while thou art sleeping. 
Faint in our hearts thy Beauty's image lies, 

Weary the watch the waiting lamps are keeping. 

Wake, sweet one, wake, our hope else dies. 

|0 more Aschemon's coil may bar or bound thee. 
No more Mal'bodea's might compel thy sighs, 
\ Fayremonde thy Trueheart's arms at last are round thee. 
Wake, sweet one, wake, I kiss thine eyes ! 






u 



CI 33 



And Trueheart the Knight taking from his helm the spray of blossom, 
bends over the sleeping Fayremonde & wakes her with a kiss. The spell 
being broken she rises in happy wonder from her long trance. The Seven 
Lamps the while awake and re-kindle their extinguished flames. 

Then enter, as a sub masque, to symbolize the awakening of beauty and 
the joy of life renewed, five couples richly attired, the colours of their 
raiment displaying the colours of the rainbow in order. Each pair repre- 
sent respectively the Senses of Hearing, Seeing, Tasting, Smelling, and 
Touching, and bear proper emblems. Each sense is illustrated in turn in 
the movements of the dance which follows and closes the scene. 



34 





THE SIXTH SCENE. 

THE TRIUMPH. 

The Prolocutor from his place speaks as follows: 

PROLOCUTOR. 

low in achievement new the spirits rare 
Of Labour and Invention draw and bear 

I The seat of amity and power. Here throned 
Shall Fayremonde sit with Trueheart, while atoned 
Shall London's penance be, the Demons stayed. 
And she recovered — most fair arrayed, — 
With Freedom and rich Commerce take her place 
With her fair sisters of the past, and grace 
The Court of Truth and Beauty, evermore 
As one — through changing forms of Art the core 
Of Life; beneath whose sway fresh from the dews 
Of Strife and Hope the weary world renews 
Her youth. Then shall the Spirit of the Age 
Recite the Epilogue and close the page. 

The characters are discovered in place as at the end of the last scene. A Tri- 
umphant March is played, while a fair seat is then brought in by Labour 
and Invention and placed under the arch of the inner scene. Then Fayre- 
monde led byTrueheart, is enthroned on it, he standing at her right hand. 
In attendance upon Fayremonde are the Seven Lamps & the Five Senses. 
All these having taken their places, then shall enter London torn and dis- 
hevelled, still pursued by the Demons. She kneeling at the feet of Fayre- 
monde sues for help. Trueheart at her appeal draws his sword and con- 
fronts the Demons, who, hesitating in their attack, are preparing to slink 
ofF,but the Lamps close in on them crescent- wise, and Simplicity & Good- 
will drive forward Cupiditas, Scampinus, Ignoramus, Bogus, and Jerry- 
builtus with scourges up to the glass of Truth, before which they cower 
and shrink. Of the three other Demons meanwhile, Philistinus stands 
stolidly looking on; Bumblebeadalus and Slumdum pulling their official 
and hypocritical robes respectively about them, stand, taking sides with 
the powers ot good, and sneakingly applauding the confusion and con- 
demnation of the others. These latter are driven off the stage in disgrace 
as aliens, and the other three who are moving off also, are arrested and 
brought up for judgment. The robes of Bumblebeadalus and Slumdum 
are stripped off by the Cherubs who then scourge the naked and wing- 
less creatures round and off the stage. Finally with a burst of impotent 
rage Malebodea the Witch likewise rushes off. 

C2 35 



Then enter the Fair Cities with their attenaants, ana aomg nomagc lu 
Fayremonde and Trueheart, they also take their places and foirma court, 
London, who, during the passage with the Demons, had withdrawn her- 
self under the protection of Fayremonde's court, now re-enters, her aspect 
changed, and being clad in a fair, rich emblazoned mantle, she is led by 
Freedom and Commerce and enthroned opposite to Fayremonde (whose 
seat has meanwhile been moved to the side of the stage). She then re- 
ceives from Labour and Invention a crystal sphere and a sceptre, and so 
takes her place as a Fair City among the Fair Cities. Then may be sung 
the following: 

SONG OF TRIUMPH. 

ILL is done! 
ly/fnrn^ All is won ! 
ir ft3^ Doubt and fear no more confound us: 
Rising hopes renewed surround us: 
Rising day 
Drives night away, 
Morning throws its beams around us. 
Making summer holiday. 
Heaven sends Nature down to us again. 
Renewing our dull Earth like summer rain. 

f S there hope? 

Is there hope? 

What see the hills that gird our city round. 
And take large outlook of our English ground? 
Far to the verge where rolls our sea 
That clasps us in its arms and keeps us free; 
But on the hither side. 
Narrowing the prospect wide. 
Look into one dim pit of smoke and flame 
Where boils and fumes our strength and pride and shame. 
Where hearts of gold are melted into dross. 
And hearts of earth are beaten into gold. 
And, streaming like a tide, the gain and loss 
Beat to and fro 
With ceaseless ebb and flow. 
Writing the tragedy of young and old. 
Where bright-eyed lives are caught and stricken blind. 
And stifled in the nets of greed. 
And bought and sold; 
36 





Or, if perchance their feet are freed, 
Rush on in abject fear of being left behind. 

[AKE again! 

lO wake again! 
Heart of our English land that lies asleep. 
And show us, on the other side the steep, 
All round, the fair Champain. 
For Rome might die yet Italy remain. 
And shall we say, who hear our cities weep. 
Our sands are also run? 
Our day nigh done. 
That cold decay 
Draws its twilight veil of gray 
Before our sun? 
O rather say, 

That year by year, within the purple main. 
Our land renews its strength again 
As spreads the spring once more 
With coy delayings along the northern shore; 
And, day by day. 
Morning rises grave or gay 
And sometimes brings as with the dawn. 
The Baltic cold with daggers drawn 
That sweeps the landscape gray, 
And sometimes a fairer scene 
Where falls the sun on meadows green 
While the south-west leads out the lambs to play. 

JLL these things remembering, 

I We, the children of the changing clime, 
J That trains our spirits to be great. 
And take the unreckoned chances of our fate. 
And meet the varying time. 
Together sing 

Our tale of winter and of spring. 
And play our mime of Beauty's wakening. 

{AKENthen 

] Spirit of Beauty ! once again. 
Lead with new hope our aimless feet along! 
'Teach us our trade ! " the children cry; 

37 





'^ 



" Show us our way and force us to be strong! 
" And though the sunshine never tarries long 
"To slack our wills, 

" Yet point a clearer path on fresher hills, 
" Beneath a kinder sky ! " 

Then shall the Spirit of the Age appear as a cloaked figure with winged 
cap and wings upon his feet, having a scroll and pen in one hand & hold- 
ing aloft a search-light in the other. He advances to the centre of the 
stage and at its very front shall then recite the following verses as 

EPILOGUE. 

I ME claim thine own ! Our little hour is o'er; 
Thy things that are, replace our things that seem. 
And re-assert thy kingly power once more 
And take as thine our Vision and our Dream. 

HOUGH thine the withered petals of the rose. 
Thine the dead glories of its scent, its hue. 
Yet ours the buds that burgeon and disclose 
Fresh hopes that still shall live, and still renew. 

UR hopes are left; for Hope and Art are one: 
Young Hope,youngArt,each holding hand of each, 
Our pictured fancy fled. Time's world begun, 
Hope is the lesson that our dream shall teach. 




m 



Which said he leads all the company forth in procession. And they shall 
march round the stage, triumphant music playing the while, & descend 
into the hall, passing down an aisle through the audience to the further 
end of the hall and returning to the stage, where 

EXEUNT OMNES. 



38 



THE AUTHORS, AIDERS AND ABETTORS OF 
THE ABOVE LITERATURE WHO HAVE CON- 
SPIRED TOGETHER TO ASSAULT THE PUBLIC 
CONFIDENCE WITH THEIR PATCHWORK; 
BLUSHING TO APPEND THEIR NAMES, EACH 
AT THE FOOT OF HIS PIECE; YET MANFUL 
TO UNDERTAKE THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR 
THEIR WORK (LEST IT SHOULD, HAPLY, BE 
WRONGLY ASCRIBED &THUS SHOULD WEIGH 
ON THE WRONG SHOULDER) HAVE SUBSCRIB- 
ED THEMSELVES WITH CERTAIN MARKS, 
WHICH THEY HERE CLAIM AS THEIR OWN, 
AND IN THUS SAYING FAREWELL, WOULD, 
IN THE MANNER OF THE OLD SCRIBES, BEG 
EACH HIS SHARE IN THE CHARITABLE CON- 
SIDERATION OF THE READER. 





C. R. ASHBEE. 
WALTER CRANE. 
SELWYN IMAGE. 
C. HARRISON TOWNSEND. 
C. W. WHALL. 
WILSON. 



THE FOREGOING LETTERPRESS SET UP FOR 
THE ART WORKERS' GUILD ATTHE PRESS OF 
THE GUILD OF HANDICRAFT, LIMITED, ES- 
SEX HOUSE, BOW, UNDER THE SUPERVISION 
OF C.R.ASHBEE,JUNE, EIGHTEEN HUNDRED 
AND NINETY-NINE. 




THE CHARACTERS OF THE 
MASQUE. 



TIME 


Mr. C. Harrison Townsenc 


THE PROLOCUTOR 


Mr. Selwyn Image. 


THE WINDS 




N. Wind 
W. Wind 
E. Wind 
S. Wind 


Mrs. Led ward. 
Miss E. Cooke. 
Miss L. Chaplin. 
Miss Parkhouse. 


MARCH 


Master Harold Beaumont. 


DECEMBER 


Miss Enid Ledward. 


MUSICIANS IN DANCE OF WINDS. 


TRUEHEART 

HOPE 

FORTITUDE 

FAYREMONDE 

MALEBODEA 

ASCHEMON, the Dragon 


Mr. Paul WoodrofFe. 
Miss Brend. 
Miss Standage. 
Miss Alexander. 
Miss Brandon. 
Mr. Lancelot Crane. 


THE SEVEN LAMPS. 




Memory 

Beauty 

Truth 

Power 

Sacrifice 

Obedience 

Life 


Miss Chaplin. 
Mrs. Clarke. 
Miss Walker. 
Miss Woodcock. 
Miss Grace Knewstub. 
Miss Boone. 
Mrs. Grant. 


CLIO : The Muse of History 


Miss Helena Head. 


THE FAIR CITIES. 




Thebes 
Athens 
Rome 
Byzantium 
di 


Mrs. Wheeler. 
Miss Wackermann, 
Mrs. Bishop. 
Miss D. Wolner. 



THE FAIR CITIES (continued) : 

Florence Miss Ashbee. 

Venice Mrs. C. R. Ashbee. 

Nuremburg Miss Johnstone. 

Paris Mrs. Oakley Williams. 

Oxford Miss Harwood. 



WORTHIES IN ATTENDANCE ON THE CITIES. 



Thebes: Rameses 
Athens: Pheidias 
Grecian Youths 

Rome: Augustus 
Roman Youths 



Byzantium: Constantine 
St. Helena 

Florence: Dante 
Cimabue 
Trainbearers 

Venice : The Doge 
Titian 
Two Brides of the 

Adriatic 
Three Halberdiers 



Nuremburg : Albert Durer 
Trainbearers 

Craftsmen 



Dr. Wheeler. 
Mr. F. W. Pomeroy. 
Mr. C. Downer. 
Mr. A. S. Tuckey. 
Mr. F. Madox HuefFer. 
Mr. J. Bailey. 
Mr. A. Pilkington. 
Mr. Lewis Hughes. 

Mr. Gerald Moira. 

Miss May Morris (Mrs. Sparling). 

Mr. Douglas Cockerell. 
Mr. Arthur Cameron. 
Master Tom Ireson. 
Master Gilbert Ledward. 

Mr. M. White. 

Mr. Hugh Stannus. 

Miss Trust. 

Mrs. Douglas Cockerell. 

Mr. G. F. Loosely. 

Mr. C. H. B. Quennell. 

Mr. J. Pyment. 

Mr. Walter Crane. 
Master OlafCaroe. 
Master Whall. 

Mr. Cyril Kelsey, Goldsmith. 
Mr. H. Ponting, Brazier. 
Mr. C. H. Holden, Brazier. 
Mr. Austin Gomme, Mason. 
Mr. Sidney Cotton, Blacksmith. 
Mr. A. G. Rose, Cobbler. 



WORTHIES IN ATTENDANCE ON THE CITIES (continued) 



Paris : St. Louis 


Mr. E. R. Hughes. 


Joan of Arc 


Miss Susan Cox. 


Herald 


Miss Caroe. 


Three Arts and Graces 


Miss Metchim. 




Miss Netter. 




Miss Stone. 


Oxford : King Alfred 


Mr. C. J. Harold Cooper. 


William of Wykeham 


Mr. C. W. Whall. 


Acolytes, Scholars, &c. 


Master Whall. 




Master H. Edwards. 




Master Fred Brooks. 




Master Fred Rhead. 




Mr. H. R. Thomas. 




Mr. J. W. Barnes. 


London 


The Baroness de Bertouche, 


DEMONS. 




Philistinus 


Mr. H. Longden. 


Bogus 


Mr. A. S. Haynes. 


Scampinus 


Mr. H. M. Fletcher. 


Cupiditas 


Mr. C. C. Brewer. 


Ignoramus 


Mr. T. R. Spence. 


Bumblebeadalus 


Mr. 0. N. Ayrton. 


Slumdum 


Mr, A. H. Macmurdo. 


Jerrybuiltus 


Mr. C. Spooner. 


THE FIVE SENSES. 




Sight 


Miss G. Parnell. 




Mr. G. F. Metcalfe. 


Hearing 


Mrs. Caroe. 




Mr. W. D. Caroe. 


Smell 


Miss G. Reynolds. 




Mr. Lionel Crane. 


Taste 


Miss Fawsett. 




Mr. N. EvilL 


Touch 


Miss Oswald. 




Mr. F. Inigo Thomas. 


THE VOICE OF THE UNCONSCIONABLE. 


LABOUR 


Mr. P. Fielding. 


INVENTION 


Miss Maud Ritchie. 


FREEDOM 


Miss B. Crane. 


COMMERCE 
da 


Miss Young. 



43 



THE SPIRIT OF THE AGE Mr. Stacy J, Aumonier. 



FOREST LEAVES 



Miss Una Cockerell. 
Miss L. Aman. 
Miss Phyllis Beaden. 
Miss Maude Brooks. 
Miss Queenie Cross. 
Miss Janet Hird. 
Miss Phyllis Logan. 
Miss Stella Margetson. 
Miss Beryl Mount. 
Miss Van Duryer. 
Miss E. Van Duryer. 
Miss Stella West. 
Miss Evelyn West. 
Miss Veronica Whall. 
Miss Hilda Ledward. 



44 



THE GUILDHALL. 



1. EXTERIOR. AUTOLITHOGRAPH BY T. R. WAY. 

2. EXTERIOR. BY JOSEPH PENNELL. 

3. INTERIOR LOOKING EAST. BY JOSEPH PENNELL. 

4. INTERIOR LOOKING WEST. BY JOSEPH PENNELL. 

5. ENTRANCE. BY C. J. WATSON. 



"THE GUILDHALL" 
AN AUTOLITHOGRAPH 
BY T. R. WAY 



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■,i*,'ii.|U»"i«ii»i»i.-r--=::^:^-jp;m r ''JIJ*^ 







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THE STAGB AND ITS ACCESSORIES. 

6. THE STAGE. AUTOLITHOgIiAPII BY HENRY WILSON. 

7. PLAN OF THE STAGE. BY HENRY WILSON. 

8. THRONE oriVORY. BY W. R. LETHABY. 

9. CAPITAL OF ONE OF THE COLUMNS. BY H&|tY WILSON. 

10. CAPITAL OF ONE OF THE COLUMNS. BY ^i|*lRY WILgON. 

11. SWOftD FOR TRUEH&i^TE. BY NELSONJ DAWSON. 

12. THE SCEPTRE FOR "LONDON." BY ALgX. FJlHEB:. 

13. CLASP AND KEYS FOR " LONDON." BY C. R. ASHBEE. 

14. SHIELD FOR TRUEHEAR^iPi. BY A. J. SiHIRLEY. 




THE STAGE 

AN AUTOLITHOGRAPH 

BY HENRY WILSON 



m 



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s'O^^ 



**%IMX6* 







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CAPITAL TO ONE OF STAGE 

COLUMNS 

BY HENRY WILSON 



Q 



;»iOAT8 io :s^io 1 ia i-4Aa 

c/rM'\XXOD. 



'»:^',i;?«*i 




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COSTUMES. 



IS- 
i6. 

1 8. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23- 
24. 

25- 
26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 

3°- 

31- 

32- 

33- 

34- 

35. 

36. 

37- 
38. 

39- 



THE PROLOCUTOR. BY SELWYN IMAGE. 
TRUEHEARTE THE KNIGHT. BY WALTER CRANE. 
ASCHEMON THE DRAGON. BY WALTER CRANE. 
FAYREMONDE. BY HENRY WILSON. 
THE FAIR CITY OF ATHENS. BY WALTER CRANE. 
THE FAIR CITY OF THEBES. BY HENRY HOLLIDAY. 
THE FAIR CITY OF PARIS. BY E. R. HUGHES. 
THE LAMP OF SACRIFICE. BY HENRY WILSON. 
THE LAMP OF OBEDIENCE. BY HENRY WILSON. 
DANTE. BY H. M. PAGET. 
RAMESES II. BY HENRY HOLLIDAY. 
KLEIO. BY HENRY HOLLIDAY. 
TITIAN. BY HUGH STANNUS. 
ALBERT DURER. BY WALTER CRANE. 
DANTE ATTENDANT ON FLORENCE. BY 
TITIAN ATTENDANT ON VENICE. BY C. 



C. 
R. 



R. ASHBEE. 

ASHBEE. 

PHEIDiEUS ATTENDANT ON ATHENS. BY C. R. ASHBEE. 
ST. LOUIS ATTENDANT ON PARIS. BY E. R. HUGHES. 
PAGE ATTENDANT ON PARIS. BY E. R. HUGHES. 
LONDON. BY WALTER CRANE. 

DANCE OF THE FIVE SENSES. BY WALTER CRANE. 
LABOUR. BY GERALD MOIRA. 
INVENTION. BY GERALD MOIRA. 
THE MONTHS. BY LOUIS DAVIS. 
FREEDOM AND COMMERCE. BY WALTER CRANE. 



nrRUEHEARTE 
•THE KNIOHT 




m 




m 




m 




£R.H. 




" THE LAMP OF OBEDIENCE " 
BY HENRY WILSON 




ALBERT DURER- 






" VENICE AND TITIAN " 
BY C. R. ASHBEE 





*^ ■%' 














El 




EWJ4,^),^,_^ 





.G^Et-AlAW*!-^. 








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OcrOBERj^^ 



Ko\)!7\BERs._-^ 




DEMONS. 



40. THE LORD OF THE DEMONS 

41. SCAMPINUS. BY C. WHALL. 

42. BUMBLEBEADALUS. BY C. WHALL. 

43. CUPIDITAS. BY C. WHALL. 

44. SLUMDRUM. BY C. WHALL. 

45. SCAMPINUS. BY T. R. SPENCE. 

46. DEMON. BY A. S. HAYNES. 

47. DEMON. BY J. D. BATTEN. 

48. BOGUS. BY C. R. ASHBEE. 

49. THE RED DEMON. BY W. STRANG 



BY T. R. SPENCE. 



\ ^^^ ALL ^AT EVH-f^ WETMT n^ ith 











THE RED DEMON. 



SUNDRY DRAWINGS. 




GENIUS OF THE MASQUE. BY C. HOLROYD. 

SPIRIT OF THE MASQUE. BY W. STRANG. 

A DEMON IN MUFTI. BY L. RAVEN HILL. 

CLIFFORD'S INN, THE HOME OF THE ART WORKERS' 
GUILD. BY T. R. WAY. 

ENTRANCE TO CLIFFORD'S INN. BY JOSEPH PENNELL. 

HALL, CLIFFORD'S INN. BY C. O. MURRAY. 

REHEARSAL OF THE MASQUE AT STIRLING LEE'S STUDIO- 
BY F. W. LAWSON. 

SKETCH FROM NELSON'S MONUMENT IN THE GUILD- 
HALL. BY BERESFORD PITE. 
AND 59. OPENING BARS OF MUSIC. BY MALCOLM LAWSON. 
DRAWN BY PAUL WOODROFFE. 







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SONG OF TRIUMPH ^ 

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THE AWAKENING KISS 



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J>ermanent Photogfraphs "^ 



OP THE WORKS OF 



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Sir EDWARD BURNE-JONES, Brt 



Q. F. WATTS, R.A. 



DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI. 



HARRY BATES, A.R.A., Homer 

and others. 



HAGUE GALLERY, A Selection from. 

By F, HoLLYER, Jun. 



ALBERT MOORE and other Artists. 



ITHE studios ... 

ARE OPEN TO VISITORS 
DAILY 

from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Mondays 
from lo a.m. to lo p.m. 

)ORTRAITS FROM LIFE J 

are taken on Mondays only. 
An Afipointment is Advisable. 



CAN BE OBTAINED OP 

Fredk. Hollyer, 

9 Pembroke^Squate, 

Kensington. 

Illustrated Catalogue, 
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Extra Winter Numbers of **THE STUDIO" 

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k Course of Instruction in Wood-Carving 

according to tlie Japanese Method 

By CHARLES HOLME 

(Editor of "The Studio ") 

ii^ With Seventy-Two Illustrations and Four Plates. Bound in cloth, sm. cr. 8vo. Price 2s. 6d, net 

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M^GleeJonWhite 

on^irnplicityof D^ign 

is reprinted at the 

erid ofthis book^ 



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